Moving a Domain

This chapter will help you move any domain from a NetWare server to a Linux or Windows server. Remember that since we are also upgrading at the same time, you must move/upgrade your primary domain before you move any secondary domains.

If you have post offices that reside on the same NetWare server, those post offices can continue to be accessible while you move the domain.

In the previous chapter, we installed the DBCopy utility that we use to migrate the data from the source server to the new Linux or Windows server. Additionally, during the setup of your Linux server, you installed ncpfs, which allows us to attach to a NetWare server via NCP copy the data. The steps we will take are as follows:

  • Create a mount point on Linux for the NetWare server, or map a drive from Windows to the NetWare server.
  • Unload the existing Message Transfer Agent (MTA) for the domain you are moving. We will need exclusive access to the domain database, so no gateways should be loaded.
  • Unload any gateways associated with this domain.
  • Rename the domain directory to avoid any accidental access while we are relocating the domain.
  • Ensure that all file and directory names for the domain are lowercase if you are moving to Linux.
  • Copy the domain directory structure from it’s current location to the new Linux or Windows server using DBCopy.

After these steps, we will proceed to the chapter on Upgrading Your GroupWise Domain.

So, let’s see how this all works.

Attach to Your NetWare Server

Linux – Create a Mount Point for the NetWare Server

In order to move your domain from NetWare, you need to attach to the NetWare server from your new Linux server. To mount the NetWare volumes into your Linux file system, perform the following steps:

  1. On the new Linux server, open up a terminal window.
  2. “su root” to become root for this session.
  3. Create a directory structure for your mount point. For our purposes, we have created /mnt/gw1 as the mount point for our NetWare server that is named gw1. It is suggested that you replace gw1 with the actual name of your NetWare server for ease of recognition later.
  4. We have chosen to connect to our NetWare server via ncpfs. To mount the NetWare server via ncpfs, issue the following command

 

ncpmount -S server -A 123.123.123.123 -U userid -P password /mnt/gw1

replacing your server name for “server” and your server’s IP address for 123.123.123.123. For example

ncpmount -S gw1 -A 192.168.100.200 -U danita.cnc -P password /mnt/gw1

 

NOTE: You might wonder about the “user.context” vs. “.user.context” in this example. While “.user.context” works on some versions of Linux, it fails on others. In my testing, “user.context” has always worked on all versions. You might keep this in mind if you experience any problems authenticating with ncpmount.

 

This will actually mount all volumes from the NetWare server to this location. So, if we cd to /mnt/gw1 will will see a directory called SYS, one called GWDATA, and any other volumes that are on that server.

Windows – Map a Drive to Your NetWare Server

It may be that your login script will automatically map a drive for you from your new Windows server to your NetWare server. Otherwise, map a drive by finding the volume in Windows Explorer, right-clicking the volume, and choosing Map Network Drive.

Unload the MTA

First of all, go to the NetWare server where the MTA for your domain is loaded and press F7 at the agent console to unload the agent. Also make sure that no administrators are accessing the domain database through ConsoleOne.

Unload Gateways

If this domain also owns a GWIA and/or WebAccess Agent, these must be loaded prior to moving the domain. Press F7 where appropriate to unload the gateways.

Rename Your Domain Directory

To avoid any accidental access to the domain during the copy, we recommend you rename your domain directory to something like domain.old. If you are unable to rename the directory, it is likely that something still has the wpdomain.db file open. Double check that all administrators have shut down ConsoleOne, and that the MTA and all gateways have been unloaded.

Copy the Domain Files to New Server

After the MTA is unloaded, we will prepare to copy the domain structure to the new server. Let’s look at the current directory structure of our domain. Figure 4-1 shows the domain directory for our domain. Notice that on NetWare most files and directories are in all uppercase (this is also dependent on your GroupWise version and more recent versions create everything lowercase to avoid problems down the road).

    1. FigureL-D5.tiffDomain Directory Structure

All files and directories for the domain and post office on Linux must be all lowercase, otherwise the agents will simply not see the “proper” file and will fail to load. Prior to loading the MTA on our new Linux server, we will need to change the case of all files and directories for the domain. We will use DBCopy for this purpose.

DBCopy makes no changes to the original files in the domain directory. If needed, you could simply rename your domain directory back to its original name and load your MTA back up on the source server.

To Linux

When running dbcopy, you will find that DBCopy on the Linux server does not run well from any directory other than /opt/novell/groupwise/agents/bin so we will cd to that location to run the utility. Run DBCopy to copy your files from the source server to the Linux location like this:

./dbcopy -m -d <source> <destination>

so for our situation it would be

./dbcopy -m -d /mnt/gw1/GWDATA/domains/cnc2.old /grpwise/domains/cnc2

This will copy all needed data from the old domain directory into the directory structure that we’ve indicated for the destination. In our case, we have chosen to locate our domain in /grpwise/domains/cnc2.

The -m switch copies the files over in all lower case. The -d switch tells DBCopy that it is migrating a domain. Generally this will not take long at all to perform the copy. Unless you have many files in your existing MTA queues, there is not really much to copy!

 

NOTE: It’s a good idea to look through your domain directory structure for old log files, files in the problem directories, etc. to clean up prior to copying the directory structure. This will ensure that you don’t needlessly copy unnecessary information to the new server.

To Windows

Once we are ready to move the domain directory structure to our new Windows server, we will rename the domain directory to avoid any accidental access by administrators using ConsoleOne, NWADMIN, etc. We will copy, not move, all of the files. If needed, you could simply rename your domain directory back to its original name and load your MTA back up on the source server.

Most people will simply connect directly to the NetWare server from the new Windows server, and then copy the data from the source server to the new Windows location. While you could use dbcopy for this purpose, it’s really not necessary for the domain, since we are copying the domain directory one time, and do not need to deal with a second pass. The domain directory is rarely very large (unless you have a lot of logs saved there), and should copy very quickly.

 

NOTE: It’s a good idea to look through your domain directory structure for old log files, files in the problem directories, etc. to clean up prior to copying the directory structure. This will ensure that you don’t needlessly copy unnecessary information to the new server.

 

At this point, with your domain on the new server, continue on with the instructions in Upgrading Your GroupWise Domain.